Review: Nathaniel Kinsey – Making the Most Out of Nothing

Review: Nathaniel Kinsey – Making the Most Out of Nothing

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Nathaniel Kinsey Making the Most Out of Nothing

Late last year, a musician by the name of Nathaniel Kinsey dropped his album titled Making The Most Out Of Nothing, being the debut consisting of recently written songs as well as some that were written years ago. While he’s been in the scene for a while, 2017 would be the year it all comes together in one package of throwback style rock ‘n roll. For something that has the goal of sticking to traditional standards, Making The Most Out Of Nothing refrains from staying one dimensional, busting out tunes in the realm of rock ‘n roll, power pop, and heavy metal alike. This sweet blend, regardless of the angle of attack, relies on a few main things, and stays melodic at all points, steering clear of any screaming or extreme harsh distortions. On the other hand, nothing stands out as a ballad, so most of the attitude remains on the same elevation.

Many of the metal aspects lie within the riff work, which is evident right off the bat with “Back Down To One”, especially since it doesn’t stick strictly to major keys. Songs like “Don’t Touch Me” and “Ice Queen” are somewhat reminiscent of this as well, but have more of a glam metal touch. One of the standout tracks titled “Not My Style” gears things towards a happier sentiment, implementing the strongest sense of melody and vocal enhancement. The vocal styles are also where the power pop tactics come into play, utilizing many harmonies and backing voice to add a refurbished touch and softness to the atmosphere. This, along with the cleaner guitar distortions glisten up the happier tracks, offering some more variety. So really, there’s a lot to get from this collection of tunes.

Obviously, with intentions of stripping down to the rock n roll roots, there isn’t going to be any wicked studio tampering nor crystallization in the production. This means it’s void of any autotune, and the mix is stacked in a uniform style. Since it isn’t an overtly heavy record, the fault of too much noise isn’t present either, which is nice. I will note, the vocals get a little bit drowned out in the mix, which can make them harder to shine through with the power that was likely intended. The singing is always on key and flows together well, but there’s an apparent lack of energy that should have broken through stronger with the instrumentation.  Besides that, there aren’t many flaws that stand out.

When push comes to shove, this may not appeal to everyone that’s big into the metal edge. While heaviness comes and goes, it’s more for those that seek melody and very strong harmonies, as well as simple yet steady and solid song construction. I recommend this to anyone who digs KISS, Cheap Trick, or Bon Jovi. Rock ‘N Roll lovers should seek this out immediately.

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