Review: Perduratum “Exile’s Anthology”

Review: Perduratum “Exile’s Anthology”

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The young but powerful band from Mexico Perduratum has released their first record independently, EP “Exile’s Anthology”. They were formed in 2019, so this EP is a big event for them, the very first releases are always excited and nervous experience for the newly-fledged bands.

Perduratum plays modern kind of progressive metal with immense djent influence, as well as touched by electronica, jazz and art rock. Their music isn’t innovative, but these Mexican musicians aren’t the boring copycats of some progressive monsters like Dream Theater or djent geniuses like Tesseract, they play sincere and catchy material, showing the best in technical matters. It’s difficult to say, what kind of music is closer to them – sophisticated progressive/art rock of the 70-80s, or modern and groovy hardcore/djent of futuristic prospects, because they combine these two music generations in one bright burst of creativity.

The album starts with short piano introduction, pensive and melancholic, but with the positive vibes, dictating the general mood of all this 20-minute long release. Then the typical extreme progressive riffs emerge, blasting with intense drive till the keyboards join in. Keyboards (performed by Edgar Butanda) play on “Exile’s Anthology” the principal role, they are responsible for diversity and multifunctional music styling, sending the listener from the improvising progressive playground of the past to the futuristic and cosmic modern vibrations from the 21st century. The synths have a plenty of functions – to lighten hardcore meaty guitar riffs with pop and electronic moves, to smoothen and refine the metal foundation with jazzy and art rock piano passages and to create modernistic atmosphere with futuristic elements.

“Abyss’ Anatomy” is the slowest song on this record, but it is also less emotional in relation to voice of singer Diego Cholula. But on the track “Assumption” he spares no effort, he sings passionately and in very articulated manner. He tries so hard to use his high-pitched and balanced voice, that sometimes it seems, that he overacts in his attempts to do his best. The saddest composition is “A-Misunderstanding”, but still it has strong djent roots to be compared with tearful and gentle heavy metal ballads. But the most futuristic song is “Assumption” with an enormous variability of electro synths, inspired by electropop of 80s, alleviating the metal toughness. Metal basis is remarkably supported by well-smoothed bass lines of Ahijado, solid drum work in various tempo of Aruh and the massive and juicy guitar chords of James Ponce throughout the record, as well as technically concise solos.

Perduratum is a new name on the modern progressive scene, but they’ve started very good, because it’s not just the technically polished material with some catchy moments, they’ve managed to provide their music with the soul, aiming to affect not only musical aesthetics, but the philosophy and art as well. And the impressive cover art is full of symbolic allusions to show exactly the humanity in battle between the good and evil in the most cliché forms.

Release date: October 10th, 2020

perduratum.com

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