Review: OBSECRATION “Onwards the Mystic Paths of the Dead” [Witching Hour Productions]

Review: OBSECRATION “Onwards the Mystic Paths of the Dead” [Witching Hour Productions]

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The Greek band Obsecration throughout the entire 30-year history of existence can be proud of formidable list of records, though “Onwards the Mystic Paths of the Dead” is its only seventh full-length album, released this summer by Witching Hour Productions. Obsecration is one of the never changing bands; they chose their favorite death/thrash metal and play it for many years with the same ardency and vigor. Old school, but with high quality.

The Greek musical scene is not rich in death metal veterans, so Obsecration rightfully praises the native country with solid death metal, based on thrash metal foundation. This kind of music was popular in the 90s, and it seems like, for Obsecration we still live in those times, because the music of these Greeks hasn’t changed a bit for 30 years. Certainly there’s an option to listen some classical death metal album, but Obsecration still maintains the catchy and emotional material, but without nostalgic feeling of the death metal’s heyday. Even now, this music fits within in spirit of 21st century.

Stylistically “Onwards the Mystic Paths of the Dead” sounds like traditional death metal release, but based on thrash metal, and if it wasn’t for growling, the half of the songs easily might blend in thrash metal of 80s. There’s thrash metal with punk rock vibes (“The Cry of Those Who Rejected Life”) and thrash metal with heavy metal influence (“The Powers of Darkness”) with all the traditional speedy and trashy guitar riffs and high-pitched solos. The songs “Beyond the Nightmarish Passage at the Skeletons Valley” and “Incest, Brutality & the Abuse (Avoriaz Pt. I & Pt. II)” differ from the rest of joyous death/thrash craziness with their doom-death atmosphere and deep growling. There’s some harmonic pattern regarding the vocals, and the heavier the song, the deeper the growls, and more rapid and aggressive it is, the shriller it sounds. During the album some deceleration of tempo comes up, but not very often, giving way to the familiar hammering. Several songs have unusual structures, “Beyond the Nightmarish Passage at the Skeletons Valley” and “Circle of the Nemesis (Avoriaz Pt. III)” have dissonant and peculiar guitar riffs, creating the perfect mood for the songs. But the last song “Chaotic Threat” is more like black/death metal piece, but only temporarily, because the primitive speed is the principal component. Nonetheless the album sounds technically mature, particularly in terms of guitar solos, fitting in with all the complexity and virtuosity in concept of death/thrash metal.

The subject of death pops up everywhere – in the cover art, in lyrics, in deadly guitar riffs, so in all points Obsecration is in accordance with death metal rules. Of course, this album didn’t reinvent the wheel, but the Greeks proved with it, that they are still able to write some sensible material, without looking back and living in the 90s. So, this release will be a useful addition to all lovers of classical death metal.

Release date: August 7th, 2020

https://www.facebook.com/Obsecration/

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