Review: Nahemia “AR-CAOSAJI” [Misanthropic Assault Productions]

Review: Nahemia “AR-CAOSAJI” [Misanthropic Assault Productions]

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The Polish black metal band Nahemia, currently based in England, this year has released their first ever full-length album “Ar-Caosaji” through the independent music label Misanthropic Assault Productions, though the material was recorded three years earlier. And even if their black metal can’t be described as innovative and totally unique for 21st century, it is intense and with strong character.

Commonly Central Europe can boast of extreme metal scene with a distinctive charm of Slavonic spirit, but Nahemia always looked forward to the Western culture, so this album is much closer to English school of black metal. There aren’t too many experiments or unconventional turns on this record; it’s just pure black metal with some additional melodic, atmospheric and occult elements, and due to this versatility the music is aimed to a wider audience. But despite these softer melodic parts, Nahemia remains within the traditional black metal, and this is an important point, because the true blacksters usually aren’t so tolerant towards all those sissy melodic black bands.

The album starts with non-metal song “Teloch”, ritual and scary introduction with explicit bass lines, occult singing and minimalistic drum-beats. The song “Misanthropic Division” is also out of metal rules, acoustic tune with emotional singing and equally emotional cries. But the rest of the material falls within the aggressive standards of black metal – fast, primitive and malevolent. Generally the furious and speedy songs have advanced rapid blast beats and primal guitar riffs. But slower tracks later accelerate almost to thrash/black (like “World Annihilation”), but decelerations usually end up in a more ritualistic way (like “Vindictive Malice”). Some songs sound far more optimistic (“A Blast of Steel” and “Torturous Lords of Sheol”), but all in all “Ar-Caosaji” is soaked in dark and heavy aura, so common to uncompromising black metal. There can’t be found any smarty progressive moments, all is soaked in integral simplicity of black metal – a couple of guitar solos are very short and straightforward (“Vindictive Malic” and “9mm”), but the natural simplicity is complemented by anthem-like passages typical for folk metal (“9mm” and “Nightfall of Blackstorm”).

Nahemia is also inspired by the favorite black metal topics – misanthropy, death and demonology (and the black and white cover perfectly conveys it), and this lyrical fondness emphasizes their streamlined love for stylistic and canonic black metal. Despite the traditional attitude towards performance and compositional skills, the songs of Nahemia are easy to remember, which makes this release not for one-off listening.

Release date: October 30th, 2020

https://www.facebook.com/OfficialNahemiA/

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